NumisMaster Logo
Home
Register
Sign In
Free Newsletter

Collector Info
In Print
Site Map

More Than One Kind of Clad
February 24, 2012



Everybody knows what a clad coin is, right?

Of course, if I am asking such a question, there must be a nitpick in there somewhere.

Since 1965 the U.S. Mint has made dimes and quarters of a copper-nickel clad composition. The half dollar turned to copper-nickel clad in 1971 after being a silver clad alloy 1965-1970.

After nearly 50 years, collectors simply say clad and we know what we mean.

However, copper-nickel clad is not the only current clad composition for U.S. coins.

The Native American and Presidential dollars also have a clad alloy, though it is much better hidden than the copper-nickel clad.

The dollar coins have a copper core. On the surface is an alloy of 77 percent copper, 12 percent zinc and 7 percent.

It has a nice golden color. It is also perfectly correct to call it a clad coin. But to do so would cause no end of confusion. That’s why the “golden dollar” reference is the easiest way to refer to it.

Clad might be a correct name for the dollar composition, but to use it for the dollar is simply to invite blank stares.



More Coin Collecting Resources:

State Quarters Deluxe Folder By Warmans

• Subscribe to our Coin Price Guide, buy Coin Books Coin Folders and join the NumisMaster VIP Program

Strike It Rich with Pocket Change, 2nd Edition

Add to: del.icio.us   digg
With this blog: Email to friend   Print



Something to add? Notice an error? Comment on this blog.
  


About the Author
David C. Harper has been a coin collector since 1963. He joined the Krause Publications editorial staff in 1978 and is currently editor of Numismatic News, Bank Note Reporter and World Coin News. He also edits two books annually, North American Coins & Prices and Coin Digest. He is the author of the Class of '63 column that runs each week in Numismatic News. His first bylined numismatic article appeared in the June 1971 issue of Coins Magazine and his various Krause Publications assignments included a stint as editor of the magazine 1980-1983. Harper received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh in 1977. He had a double major of journalism and economics.

Search this Blog
Email Updates
Email me a message when a new post is added!
RSS Feed
More Links
Numismatic News
 



About Us | Contact Us | Privacy | Your data is secure
©2014 F+W Publications, Inc., Iola, Wisconsin. All rights reserved.